Clint Morgan Celebrating 10 years at IM

Lauren Biggs

Clint Morgan Celebrating 10 years at IM

February 2021 marks the 10-year mark of Clint Morgan as IM, Inc.’s general director. Here are a few reflective words from Clint below.

“It’s hard to believe, but February 10th marked my 10th year as IM’s general director. It must be noted that from February 2011 until September 2011 I served as interim director.  So, I guess it depends on from what date on the calendar one starts counting. 

I love the ministry role God has given me and pray He gives me several more good years to serve Him by serving FWB.  It would take volumes to share with you all God has done through IM over this past decade. Most of all we should collectively lift our voices in praise for His kindness, mercy, and bountiful blessings.  

In September of 2011, the IM asked me to officially make the move from interim director to fill the role of the general director. The first question asked me after I accepted this position was, “How long do you see yourself in this position”?  My answer then, and still is, ‘not one day longer than you (the board) and God want me here’.

So, until we reach that point in our journey may God help us to journey together and be faithful to ‘labor with the Body of Christ to fulfill the Great Commission’.”

The Story of Uncle Kemal – Josh Provow

Lauren Biggs

The Story of Uncle Kemal – Josh Provow

Josh Provow, IM missionary to Bulgaria, shares a recent story from his time volunteering at the local Shumen hospital during the COVID pandemic.
A little context…
The COVID pandemic continues to rage in Bulgaria. In the entire country, the Shumen hospital has more COVID patients than any other hospital. About three weeks ago I went there with a friend to help him get an administrative document from the hospital. I saw first-hand the chaos of forty or fifty people crowding around the security checkpoint trying to get information. Many of them were there to deliver food to their sick family members (food is not freely offered to most patients), but all movement was halted because they were transferring COVID patients from one section to another. I found out that there is a brief window every day in which loved ones can bring food to their relatives and many days the same chaotic scene unfolds.
So I said a quick prayer and walked past the “do not enter” sign into the administrative wing of the hospital. I knocked on the head nurse’s door and she asked what I wanted. I explained that I know nothing about medicine and that I don’t even know how to measure blood pressure, but I thought I could help by taking food deliveries from the central security point and delivering it to the different wards. She looked skeptical, but she went and talked to some sort of director and came back and said, “Okay, when can you start?” Thus began an interesting new adventure in which I go to the hospital and volunteer from 11AM-1PM on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays.
The main story…
Okay, so this past Saturday I was back at the hospital doing my thing running up and down the stairs (there are only two functioning staff elevators and they are constantly in use with stretchers and wheelchairs). Around 12PM a man came in and said he has come from a town about 40 minutes away called Provadia (I am attaching a map with pertinent locations). His relative is from a village called Drumevo (my friend E’s aunt is the mayor there and last year with a Hanna Project team we did Operation Christmas Child parties in the preschool and in the grade school). He asked me to deliver some food to his relative named Kemal (name changed) on the ninth floor. He didn’t know which room, but I told him there probably wouldn’t be more than one Kemal and that it was no problem. So up the stairs, I went to the ninth floor.
I arrived panting and sweating and rang the doorbell to the ward. A nurse came and I told her that I have a delivery for a lady named Kemal. She replied: “There’s no lady named Kemal here.” “Okay, where should I look?” “I don’t know, try the tenth floor.” So, I went up to the tenth floor and wandered the hallways, looking for someone who might know where Miss Kemal is staying. No luck. Right about this time a phone started ringing in the sack of food I was carrying. I decided to answer (as one does). Thankfully, it was the relative downstairs, obviously assuming that by now he would be talking to Kemal. I explained the situation and said the best thing I could do is go back downstairs and together we will go to information and ask what room she is in.
So I went downstairs and he and I went by the reception. I said, “Sorry to bother you, but I am having trouble looking for a lady named-“ He cut me off: “No! Kemal is not a lady! He is my uncle!” My eyes went wide. I apologized profusely and it dawned on me that UNCLE Kemal probably was on the ninth floor and the nurse just knew there was no lady by that name. So up I went and lo and behold, we found Uncle Kemal. I went back downstairs, apologized again for the delay and we parted ways.
That afternoon we went on a walk in the woods with Sevdi to find a Medieval monastery carved into a cliff (you all should really visit Bulgaria some time!). On the drive home, my phone started ringing. It was the mayor of Vehtovo. [Side note: Vehtovo is a village about 20 minutes from Shumen where we have an in-home Bible study every Sunday afternoon with a group of Turks.] I answered. She said, “Josh, I found out today that you are working as a volunteer at the hospital.” “Yes, who told you that?” “Today you helped a relative of mine find his uncle Kemal. Do you remember him?” “Yes, how could I forget? Did he tell you how mixed up I got?” “Yes, he told me, but he was so thankful for your help. The security guard told him that you are an American pastor in the city and when he called me and told me about what had happened I realized it must be you. He lives in Provadia and he wants you to go to his city and start a church.” “What? Really? I would love to talk to him about that!”
The mayor gave him my number and the next day (ironically as we were getting into the van to drive to Vehtovo) he called me. He explained that he had access to an old theater that many years ago was used by an Evangelical church but now sits empty. He said, “Josh, I am a Muslim. But I believe that God wants you to come here and start a church. You can come and use the theater, and we will put up advertisements around town and people will come!”
Yesterday I saw him again at the hospital and we talked a little more. Here are where things stand right now: soon we will go to Provadia and sit down and talk with him and find out how serious he is. This is a town that we have never stepped foot in, but a cool fun fact is that it is almost equidistant from our churches in Shumen and Varna. I do not know what God’s perfect will is, but there is no doubt in my mind that He is at work!
The moral of the story…
I am still in awe at the amazing way our God works! Do you realize that if I had known that Kemal is an uncle and not an aunt, it would have cut out 90% of my interaction with this man, and most likely he wouldn’t have found out from the security guard that I am a pastor and the connection wouldn’t have been made with the mayor from Vehtovo? The Holy Spirit put these pieces together in an amazing way so that we could have an open door to share the gospel in a new place. And one of the pieces of the puzzle was my ignorance of Turkish names!
Please pray that God would continue the amazing thing He has started!
UPDATE (Dec 8, 2020 at 8:16AM CST): “Kemal” passed away a few hours ago. Please continue to pray that even through this loss God’s light would shine through!

IM, Inc. News Release Oct 30, 2020 – Pansy Murray

Lauren Biggs

IM, Inc. News Release Oct 30, 2020 – Pansy Murray

IM, Inc. News Release October 29, 2020

Antioch, TN – IM celebrates the life and mission service of Pansy Campbell Murray.  

 

 

Pansy Murray passed away on October 25, 2020. A graveside service, conducted by Dr. Ron Callaway, was held Tuesday, October 27, 2020.

 

IM General Director Clint Morgan: ”Our hearts grieved with the passing of another IM family member. We have lost several former missionaries over the past few years. Each one brings sadness to our hearts juxtaposed to the joy of knowing they are with the one true and living God. Pansy Murray served with her husband John in France as missionaries. Her servant’s heart was revealed in many ways throughout their years there and continued to be manifested here in the U.S. after leaving the field. The IM family joins our hearts to weep with those who weep and rejoice with those who rejoice. Our prayers are with John and his children as they navigate life in the valley of the shadow of death.”

 

John and Pansy Murray served as missionaries to France beginning December 27, 1977. They attended language school from January of 1978 until June of 1979 and then arrived in Nantes, France in July of 1979. They served in France until April of 1987. 

 

 

Friends and former missionary colleagues have said that the French people appreciated Pansy greatly. With her gift of hospitality, she was a vital part of the ministry in so many practical ways. 

 

Please join the IM family in praying for John and the Murray family during their time of fond remembrance and essential grief. 

 

Instead of flowers, the family has asked for contributions to the Nashville Rescue Mission (nashvillerescuemission.org), a favorite of Pansy’s, especially during the holidays.  

Obituary for Lucy Ellen (Wisehart) Hyman

Lauren Biggs

Obituary for Lucy Ellen (Wisehart) Hyman

Former missionary to Cuba, Lucy Hyman (sister of Miss Wisehart) passed away last week and Steve and Judy Lytle represented IM at the funeral since Clint and Neil were in SC at the funeral of Kristi Johnson’s father. We appreciate their going as well as this report from Steve of the funeral.

Lucy Wisehart Lima Hyman went home to be with the Lord on Wednesday, September 2, 2020.  Judy and I were asked to represent IM for the funeral, which was held on Saturday, September 5, at First Free Will Baptist Church in Albany, Georgia.

Lucy was 90 years old when she passed away.  She was originally from Myrtle, Missouri. She graduated from Free Will Baptist Bible College (now Welch College). She also attended the University of Texas-Pan American, and Andersonville Theological Seminary, where she obtained a Doctorate in Religious Education.
Lucy served seven years with Thomas and Mabel Willey in Cuba. She then married Felix Lima, who had graduated from the Cedars of Lebanon Seminary in Pin
ar del Rio. After the Cuban Revolution, Felix and Lucy came to the U.S. and worked as missionaries to the Hispanic population in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas with the American Missionary Fellowship.
At various times, Lucy taught at several different schools, including Free Will Baptist Bible College. She and her family helped start the First Free Will Baptist Church in McAllen, TX, where she served as pianist, then organist and choir director for more than nine years.
Lucy’s first daughter, Marilyn Lima, was born in Cuba, and the second, Magdalene Lima, was born in McAllen, TX.
After her husband Felix died of cancer, Lucy married widower Rev. Dr. Irvin Hyman, and they were married for 35 years, serving the Lord in Georgia, and living in Albany.
Lucy served as managing editor for the Spanish Department at Randall House Publications for 18 years.  She assisted her husband Bro. Hyman in evangelistic services and revivals. She also served as the translator for Dr. Michael Guido, known as “The Sower,” translating his sermons and devotionals into Spanish. Additionally, she recorded an album of gospel hymns, and played the organ and sang at First Church.
Lucy had meticulously planned her funeral, and it was a good one, glorifying our Lord and honoring His servant.  Billy Hanna, her pastor for many years, preached the funeral sermon.  There were several eulogies.  Judy and I presented the throw from the Mission to the family.  There was music, including a song by Lucy herself.
After the burial, Judy and I had the privilege of having lunch with a very kind member of First Church, and were able to enjoy a time of fellowship with Lucy’s daughters. Thank you for giving us the opportunity to represent the Mission, and minister to the family.
Written by Steve Lytle. Read her obituary here.

Obituary for Marion Hanna

Lauren Biggs

Obituary for Marion Hanna

It is with great sadness that the family announces the unexpected passing of Marion Leverne Hanna Sr., 71, on Monday, August 31, 2020.

Marion was born on November 4, 1948 in Lake City, South Carolina, a son of the late Zuel and Gertrude Gaskins Hanna. He was a 1966 graduate of Johnsonville High School. He served in the U.S. Army at Ft. Meade, Maryland as a Military Policeman from 1969 – 1971 and was a lifetime member of Westside Free Will Baptist Church in Johnsonville, where he served as a deacon for the past 49 years.

His favorite activities such as fishing, driving the golf cart, attending church, playing Skip-Bo, and grilling out, all centered around spending quality time with friends and family. His free time involved frequent trips to Wal-mart and caring for animals. He was a treasured “Pa” to Alejandro, Ana, and all the kids whom he shared Smarties with. Marion always had a song to sing …. even if he couldn’t remember all of the words and he just made them up. His heart was so big that it took a machine to keep it running for 15 years after his open-heart surgery.

Surviving are his beloved wife of 52 years, Faye Hanna; children, Lee (Jennifer) Hanna of Anderson and Kristi (Tim) Johnson of Alpedrete, Spain; grandchildren Alejandro Johnson of Tennessee and Ana Johnson of Alpedrete, Spain; siblings by birth, Ruby Faye Cribb of Lexington, Zuliene (Don) Thompson of Lake City, Troy (Lorraine) Hanna of Johnsonville, and Tony (Chrystal) Hanna of Johnsonville; sibling by marriage, Mona (Steven) Dukes of Johnsonville; and numerous extended family members that were dear to him.

The family deeply appreciates all the love, prayer, and calls, but requests that family and friends refrain from visiting the house at this time.

The family will receive friends from 6:00 PM until 8:00 PM in the Westside Free Will Baptist Church, 530 Vox Highway, Johnsonville, SC 29555, directed by Morris Funeral Home of Hemingway, SC.

The burial will be private.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, please use good judgment, practice social distancing, and please wear masks if attending.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to Tim and Kristi Johnson’s Mission Account through Westside Free Will Baptist Church, PO Box 414 Johnsonville, SC 29555.

 

Written by Neil Gilliland, September 2, 2020.

IM, Inc. News Release September 1, 2020

Lauren Biggs

IM, Inc. News Release September 1, 2020

IM, Inc. News Release September 1, 2020

Antioch, TN – Victoria Little officially requested a leave of absence effective September 1, 2020. Victoria requested the leave, stating, “this has been a very different year for me as I have navigated the waters of returning from Kenya, moving to Nashville… and continuing to invest in an ever-growing relationship with my now fiancé, Bryse Paffile.”

Bryse and Victoria will be married this month in North Carolina.  Bryse currently lives and works as a physical therapist in Washington state. They will live there and prayerfully consider the following steps God has for their life and ministry. Victoria plans to become active again as a nurse to keep her license current and brush up on her nursing skills. 

When asked about the next steps concerning the mission field, Victoria said, “Bryse and I are excited to do ministry together. Our hearts are for others to know Christ, and we both desire to be overseas in the future using our medical skills to meet physical needs in order to reach spiritual ones. We do not know exactly where or what that looks like, but know that the Lord will guide us as we faithfully pursue him.” 

Victoria added, “it has been an honor to be a part of the IM team, both as a missionary and with the home team. They have become my family and part of my heart. God has done incredible things over these last three years, and I look forward to how He will continue to use IM in my and Bryse’s future.” She went on to say, “I want to give a very special thanks to every person who gave with their finances, prayers, and encouragement. I’ve learned so much about the body of Christ and love how I have experienced Him working among FWB.” 

Clint Morgan commented, “Victoria served in Kenya in an exemplary manner. Her commitment to Christ, passion for souls, and love for people endeared her deeply to the Samburu people and the whole IM family. We anxiously await the day God directs Bryse and Victoria to their next cross-cultural ministry and pray, somewhat selfishly, it will be with IM.”

Please join us in praying for Victoria and Bryse as they begin their journey together and pray that God gives clear guidance in their next ministry steps.

Cared for Missionaries – story by Jaimie Lancaster

Lauren Biggs

Cared for Missionaries – story by Jaimie Lancaster

We know God provides for IM families in many ways and YOU can be one of them!

We hope you look for opportunities to care for these families.

One of the most amazing ways we were ever cared for as missionaries
occurred when our children went away to college.

When our oldest son turned 16, we bought him an extremely used Jeep
Cherokee with 198,000 miles on it. We figured that we’d sell it at the
end of our stateside assignment. When it was time to return to Uruguay
we found out that missionaries are probably the only group of people who
would buy a car with 200,000 + miles on it. We decided we’d keep it and
use it for conferences or travel when we were in the States.

My son enrolled in a college that was about 600 miles from our stateside
home.  We sent him off to college in that high mileage Jeep. Everything
went well that first year and it made it till around Thanksgiving the
next year. One day he was returning to campus and he passed through the
town of Rogers, Arkansas and it began to overheat. He left it at a
dealer there. Imagine my surprise when I received a call from the
dealership saying that it would be $600.00 to replace the thermostat and
the water pump!  (The funniest part was that to fix all the things wrong
with it they would charge an extra $2400! This was more than we paid for
it when we bought it!) I told my son that there was no way we
could/would pay that and it would be best if he could find a shade tree
mechanic to fix it. No luck. We called some friends but they couldn’t
recommend a mechanic in the area. The hard part for me was being 5,000
miles away with a problem I could have solved myself but I was nowhere
nearby. The only thing we could do was pray and wait for an answer.

Tammy had a ladies’ Bible study at the time in our home. One day she
received a call from one of the participants and she said “I have a
group of 12 people, 11 men, and one lady, she’s got to have a break, may
I invite her to the study?” Of course, Tammy said yes. When she arrived,
we found out that this group was from a church from…. Rogers, Arkansas!
When I found out I told Tammy to ask her if some of the men could
recommend a mechanic. The lady did better than that. She gave me the
number of her pastor and he sent the church mechanic to pick up the Jeep
and fix it. When it was fixed I called to find out home much I owed and
the guy said “There’s no charge. This is something we do for
missionaries!” The church was not a Free Will Baptist Church and at the
time I had never even been to Rogers, Arkansas but we were blessed by
their kindness.

Connect Church in Russellville has also been great auto repair
servants. Once when my oldest was returning home his power steering pump
went out near Russellville. He called me and asked me what to do. I told
him to call my friend at Connect Church. An hour later he was back on
the road with a rebuilt pump and the towing and repair was covered by
our Connect Church family.

My youngest son also benefited from friendships at Connect church. He
attended Arkansas Tech and one of the leaders had a trucking company.
Just about all of his auto repairs were done by them and he only paid
for the cost of parts.

Many people take for granted a well-running, well-serviced car but those
friends and churches that helped our college-age children from point A
to point B has been some of the greatest blessings we have received.

ETeam and CMP Update 2020

Lauren Biggs

ETeam and CMP Update 2020

ETEAM and CMP Update

 

The advance of the new strain of virus called COVID-19 around the world and now in the US has affected all of us in tremendous ways. Efforts to contain and control its spread are extensive. Anxieties have increased, routines have been disrupted, and plans have become uncertain.

It seems there are still more questions than answers about the disease and the duration of its effect.

We are aware that there are also questions concerning the impact of this situation on ETEAM and CMP trips planned for this summer. The Leadership Team at IM wanted to let you know how we are processing the situation and how we will proceed to make the necessary decisions concerning our plans for this summer.

  1. We are praying and hopeful that the duration of this crisis will be short-lived and our plans will not have to be altered. We would encourage you to work on that assumption and continue to raise your support and make your plans as usual.
  2. The Leadership Team of IM will continue to monitor the situation on a daily basis. We will meet again on 𝗔𝗽𝗿𝗶𝗹 𝟭𝟱 to reassess how things are progressing. Our hope is that the threat of the virus will have declined significantly. If at any time we determine that plans must be altered or trips must be canceled, we will notify you immediately.
  3. A final decision will be made concerning ETEAM by 𝗠𝗮𝘆 𝟵. Decisions about CMP trips will be made 40 days prior to planned departure. The wellbeing of our students is our highest priority. We will not send out teams if there is any level of uncertainty concerning your safety.
  4. If you decide that you no longer desire to participate in ETEAM or CMP this year, you can withdraw from the program prior to 𝗠𝗮𝘆 𝟵 (ETEAM) or ticket purchase (CMP) without penalty. All monies given by you will be reimbursed. Support given for you by others will be returned to the donors. This decision will not hinder future opportunities.
  5. If the difficult decision to cancel trips has to be made on or before 𝗠𝗮𝘆 𝟵, you will be contacted immediately and given instructions on the options available to you.

Please understand that we are taking this very seriously and monitoring it as closely as possible so that we can make the best and most informed decisions. The safety of our students is our highest priority and will ultimately be the deciding factor in every decision we make.

Thank you for your willingness to serve in this capacity. We are thankful to have you as part of our IM family. You are in our prayers. Please pray for us as we seek the Lord’s wisdom and leading.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact 𝗗𝗮𝗻𝗻𝘆 𝗚𝗮𝘀𝗽𝗲𝗿𝘀𝗼𝗻, 𝗗𝗶𝗿𝗲𝗰𝘁𝗼𝗿 𝗼𝗳 𝗠𝗼𝗯𝗶𝗹𝗶𝘇𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻, 𝗜𝗠, 𝗜𝗻𝗰., 𝗮𝘁 𝗱𝗮𝗻𝗻𝘆@𝗶𝗺𝗶𝗻𝗰.𝗼𝗿𝗴.

 

 

Women’s Center in Ivory Coast

The Celebration of the Women’s Center

in Ivory Coast

On Saturday, March 7, the women’s ministry of Ivory Coast (women of good news) inaugurated its conference center in Bondoukou. In addition to a large hall for conferences, the center also has accommodation for visitors and girls from villages in the region who come to study in Bondoukou.

As part of the inauguration celebrations, women made a parade around the city. Almost 1,000 women were present for a women’s retreat that was followed by a THP team from the United States arriving a few days in advance to help finish the building, clean up, and prepare to receive the women’s retreat. The team stayed to participate in the opening. Representatives of local authorities, the Free Will Baptist Association, IM, Inc., WNAC, and the Free Will Baptist Foundation were also present.

The FWB Foundation had made two gifts that totaled to be around $100,000 to complete what had been raised by women in the Ivory Coast and the United States for the construction and equipment of the new center. When women in the Ivory Coast planned this project, many thought it was too great and that it would not be possible. Glory be given to God by the united efforts of many different groups!

 

 

Special thanks to Pastor Amiezu Paul for the photos and Kenneth Eagleton for the written statement.

Coronavirus – A Statement From Clint Morgan

Lauren Biggs

Coronavirus – A Statement From Clint Morgan

The IM leadership team has been closely following the ebb and flow of information about the number one world concern at this time…the coronavirus.

While it is impossible to find a one size fits all response we want to assure our IM family and FWB constituency that we are making decisions we believe reflect due diligence, precautionary actions, and protection of our field and stateside personnel as well as short-termers (eg. THP projects, CMP team, etc.). We are giving our field teams the right to stay or leave based on their situation and sound reasoning. However, we reserve the right, and certainly bear the responsibility, to exercise our fiduciary charge to safeguard the well-being of our staff and those who serve in any capacity with or for us which may mean we recall staff and impose a quarantine in certain situations.

We ask for your prayers and God’s unfathomable wisdom as we navigate these somewhat precarious waters.

Clint Morgan, IM General Director